Monday, February 3, 2014

How do you make coffee?

Even if you don't drink coffee in your everyday life, there's just something about a fresh cup of hot Joe when you're camping. It really gets you ready for a day in the fresh air. However, without a regular drip coffee maker (or the electricity to power it) how do you make your morning coffee while teardrop camping? Believe it or not, this has been one of the main questions we get when out on the road with the teardrop. It's an important topic to some people and our choices of coffee gear are very international.


Personally, when teardrop camping we use an insulated French press that makes about three to four cups of coffee. If you have not used a French press before, Howcast has a video on how to use this elegant little coffee maker. You will need to heat up water in a saucepan or a teapot first, and we do this on our camp stove or on the fire pit. The ground coffee beans go into the bottom of the French press, and the hot water is poured over the top of the beans. The top lid of the press has a plunger that you press down into the water and bean mixture which extracts out the coffee. The type of French press we have is very easy to clean out and the coffee stays warm for about half an hour in the insulated base.


Another type of camp coffee maker is the Italian espresso maker. We've used this type of pot before while teardrop camping, and the benefit is that the espresso maker can go right on the camp stove without having to boil water in another pot. This video by Sean Michael of the Long Long Honeymoon is a humorous look at how to use a Bialetti Moka Express coffee maker.



You don't have to use espresso beans in this type of pot, but it helps if the beans are finely ground. Put the ground coffee in the little filtered insert that goes on top of the bottom compartment. Cold water is poured into the bottom compartment, the top pouring compartment is screwed on, and the entire pot is put on the stove. The water from the bottom will heat up and force its way through the beans and into the pouring compartment. The pot makes a cute bubbling sound and when the bubbling stops, your coffee is done. I actually prefer this type of coffee pot and use it at home, but we are usually camping with several friends and the French press makes more coffee than the Italian pot.



Our Stargazers teardrop friends like to use the classic camp coffee maker, the percolator. This type of coffee maker uses the same science from the Italian maker, but without the forced steam. We've used this type of pot on both the stove and on a campfire grate and it makes at least five to seven cups of coffee. The coffee grounds are put into a filtered container that fits into the top of the pot. The filter has a long tube that reaches into the water inside the pot and when the water heats up, it flows through the tube, into the filter and back into the pot. I love to watch the coffee percolate into the glass viewer on top of the pot, but I personally think the coffee is a little weaker with this type of maker. Check this percolator video from Howcast.


Photo by simplerich

9 comments:

  1. I use a 6-cup Bialetti Moka Pot while camping because I find it easier to clean than a French press. I have two filter baskets of different sizes for it. I use a smaller for one person regular coffee, and a larger one if I'm making latte or americano for two people (my husband's not a coffee drinker, but he drinks lattes on weekends). At home I use both an insulated stainless steel French press and Bialetti Moka Pot depending on my mood, time I have and what sort of coffee I want. I also use a hand coffee grinder both at home and while camping, unless I'm making more than one coffee.

    http://www.amazon.com/Porlex-Mini-Stainless-Coffee-Grinder/dp/B0044ZA066/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1391445050&sr=8-2&keywords=porlex+coffee+grinder

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    1. Thanks Aneta. I agree with the Bialetti Moka being really easy to clean. How does the two filter system work? I've never seen that type before. Also, when camping do you heat up milk for your latte? Some people may laugh, but having a cappuccino or latte while camping is not glamping luxury...it's a necessity. :-)

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    2. Christina, it's not a different filter system, I simply have two filters of different depths, and I use them interchangeably depending on my need. Some units come with a little filter "lid" insert to adjust your filter size to become half as deep, depends on the brand. As far as the lattes - I don't make them while camping. Between keeping milk sufficiently cold and the mess of heating it and cleaning after it, it's just not practical :(.

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  2. Y,all are to fancy i throw the grinds in a pot of boiling water wait a few then pour it in a thermos.Most the grinds stay in the pot .pour slow and the rest stay in the thermos.

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    1. LOL! Yes, coffee preferences seem to be as varied as people.

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  3. This is a great way to make coffee! Thanks for the tips.

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  4. Hi Christina -

    When I have time - with breakfast or when staying somewhere - I like to use my Bodum French Press with ground coffee. When I am setting up camp or just somewhere for a little while and breaking out the butterfly stove and kettle I really like the individual "sticks" from Trader Joe's. Included with cream and sugar they are tasty at fifty calories.

    Great article and agree - lots of ways to make coffee and it is soooo IMPORTANT!!!

    Take care!!

    Tim

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    1. As a Dane, I gotta go with a Bodum as well. Yes, those little latte or Via packets from Starbucks also work well when light camping or hiking.

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