Monday, August 31, 2015

Tiny Camper in Lithuania

Teardrops seem to be one of the most internationally recognized camping trailers, but they still attract attention (as you can see from the excited crowd below). Eugenijus Jusas lives in Vilnius, Lithuania and built his own trailer to visit nearby countries. He's also planning to open up his own business building and selling his Tiny camper design in Lithuania.


How did you become interested in building teardrop trailers?

I built the teardrop trailer because I wanted something new for travels. In the past we've traveled by plane to other countries. A few months ago we drove to Croatia. This was our first car trip ever! When I found this type of trailer I liked the shape, size, and simplicity. I could not find any around our home or they were very expensive, so I built it myself. I like carpentry, so I didn't run into any problems.


What are the specifications of your trailer?

My trailer empty weight is 560kg (1,234 lb) and it's mounted on a 5x8 foot trailer frame. It cost approximately $4,000 to build. NOTE: Eugenijus is working with a local company to create his trailer, so he did not want to disclose his complete costs.


What do you feel makes the Tiny Camper unique?

My wife is very excited when we go camping. Sleeping in the trailer is amazing, and she is able to relax better inside the trailer than in our small apartment! Birds are chirping and trees are rustling. It's a wonderful feeling.

We both like small stuff, so the camper is small. :-) Sometimes we have a friendly argument over who gets to make breakfast. We both love the outdoor kitchen with its wide wooden countertop, gas stove and the 24 liter fridge.


Where do you like to go camping?

After a trip to Croatia, we want to spend some weekends visiting other countries, cities and spend time near lakes.



Photos courtesy of Tiny camper/Facebook

Friday, August 28, 2015

Friday Teardrop Photo


The Sunflower is getting a dose of juice from the sun. I won a 5 watt solar panel (Thanks Dave!) at a teardrop gathering and have been using it to trickle charge the Sunflower's battery. This will come in handy during Burning Man when we'll also be using a 12V clip on fan to stay cool during afternoon naps.

We've considered purchasing a larger solar panel for the trailer, but we don't use many energy hogging devices. Does anyone else have a solar panel for their teardrop trailer roof?

Monday, August 24, 2015

Greg and Marcia's Teardrop Privacy Screen

Greg and Marcia Pacetti, of Fairbanks, Alaska, have been camping in their homemade teardrop (nicknamed Sylvia) for over six years. After some time, Marcia put her foot down and said something had to be done about including a changing room with privacy. 



Greg (a freelance carpenter) turned their teardrop travel rack into a simple, but effective privacy curtain that can be used for showering, changing and the occasional potty break. He used a 1/2 inch conduit pipe with elbow connectors and a cotton shower curtain with clips to create the space. The curtain also protects the bed area from rain and sun. A bungee cord is used to stabilize the curtain against winds.



"The curtain does get dirty and wet so we spread it out somewhat in the car and it drys out," Greg said. "We then shake the dirt off and then start over."

The couple recently went on a monthlong teardrop trip of the American Northwest and Greg's favorite area was Jedediah Smith State Park in Northern California — famous for its redwoods.

"I've been dreaming of them my whole life," Greg said. "We got to sleep with the giants. This big trip was when we fell in love with the shower curtain. Because of this trip we've become very much in love with the Teardrop. The privacy curtain just might be a revolution....



Photos courtesy of Greg Pacetti




Friday, August 21, 2015

Friday Teardrop Photo


Only two die-hard teardroppers would have such a swanky trailer for their honeymoon getaway. Congratulations Kay and Grant!

Monday, August 17, 2015

Teardrop Trailer Systems and Modules

I don't want to get too technical here, but after years of teardrop camping, I've figured out the most efficient and enjoyable way to camp: systems and modules.



A system is a defined and regular set of steps to accomplish an end goal (think of your digestive system). Regularly completing those steps in order tends to become second nature and accomplishes the end goal more quickly. A module is a standardized set of units that combine to create a more complex structure. Modules can be used in everything from architecture to web design.


Both these concepts can be used in teardrop camping. Everything from packing the car to food storage and cooking — systems and modules can be set up to make a camping experience more efficient and fun. These are just a few ways we have systemized and modulized our teardrop trailer camping experience (Ugh! I sound like a corporate manual):



Systems:

1. We pack the car the same way each time. Items that need to be accessed right away at camp (work gloves, wheel chocks) are closer to the door and personal items (backpacks, purses) are closer to the driver's and passenger seats.

2. Our sink system (vacuum pot, sinks, dish soap, sponge) is set up the same way each time on a campground picnic table.

3. After every gas or restaurant stop, we do a check of the hitch system, the teardrop trailer doors and the tires.


Modules:

1. All our cooking oils and spices are located in a small blue box in the galley. While cooking, we just grab the entire box.

2. Our shower system is located in one easy-to-grab bag that fits right behind the driver's seat.

3. We have a portable toilet kit that contains everything you need for a trip to a pit toilet.

Friday, August 14, 2015

Friday Teardrop Photo


This smart, little teardrop trailer ice chest stroller was posted on the Susy's Musings blog. She is a new teardropper who recently purchased a Little Guy teardrop trailer. She saw this unique design at the Lake Perris teardrop rally.

Monday, August 10, 2015

Featured Teardrop: Teddybear Teardrops

Bobby Morgan and his son, Ryan, build simple, but beautiful woody teardrop trailers in Marietta, Georgia. The Teddybear Teardrop company has already been featured on the Tiny House Talk blog and Bobby mentioned that building them with Ryan has brought the two of them closer together.


“It takes me back to a time where myself and my father would build things together,” Bobby said. “I know he would be proud of these campers and I wish that he could have seen one. Now we have a four-year-old little girl running around, she helps me go buy the things we need to build teardrops, and hopefully soon she will be able to carry on the tradition of building them as well.”



Where does the name Teddybear Teardrops come from?

Teddybear Teardrops has a special meaning to us. We have Teddy Bears everywhere, we have always like them, my son kept one as a companion while growing up, so it just seemed perfectly normal to name our teardrops after the bear.

How did you become interested in building teardrop trailers?

I got interested in teardrop campers in 2009. I was browsing camping and camper sites on the internet when I saw a picture of one and instantly I was hooked. I loved the simplicity of them, as far as being lightweight and being able to be towed with just about anything. 

I have always loved camping, whether it be a tent or a Class A motorhome. I wanted to build one immediately, but with my work schedule the way it was (having to travel sometimes up to two months at a time) my wife said no. So I just researched and dreamed of building one for almost three years. 

Then I got injured and couldn't do the job that I loved. So my son Ryan and I bought a trailer, came home and told my wife that we had to build one, since we had a trailer. She wasn't so sure at first but as our first Teddybear Teardrop started to take shape, she started to like it. Plus she could see how much better it made me feel to be building something. 

When we got it mostly finished, we took it to Tennessee for a teardrop gathering. Everyone who saw it loved it. I really enjoyed sleeping in it that weekend. At that point I decided to start building them for everyone who wanted one. It was tough at first to find buyers, so I took them to car shows and other gatherings. People loved our teardrops. Some wanted just basic shells and others wanted all-out glamour. 


What are the specifications of your trailers?

We build a 4x8 that weighs around 750 lb, and a 5x8 that weighs around 1,200 lb. They range in price from $7,200 upwards to $9,700, depending on what people want. We put 110v and 12 volt inside and in the galley. We insulate the ceiling and floors. I just love the look of wood exterior. 


What do you feel make the Teddybear unique? 

What I feel make Teddybear Teardrops unique is the fact that we build each and every teardrop the way our customer wants it. I have an attachment to each teardrop that we build. Each one has its own personality and sometimes an attitude while we are building it.



What are some interesting features of your trailers?

We use spar urethane for the exterior and interior to prevent water damage, and white aluminum on the roof to reflect heat. Most of our customers want the simple style, without appliances. But with our numerous cabinets there is plenty of room for storage, without everything falling out when you open the galley hatch.



Where do you like to go camping and where is your dream camping trip?

I have camped mainly in the southeastern United States. But my dream is to do what one of my customers did: travel Route 66 and to take in all the sights and roadside explorations along the way. I will get there one day.


Photos courtesy of Bobby Morgan/Teddybear Teardrops